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Obesity May Not Be a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease After All

Obesity May Not Be a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease After All

Researchers from the Umeå University in Sweden studied identical twin pairs to draw their conclusions

Results suggest that decreasing the risk for cardiovascular disease is more complicated than just losing weight.

A study conducted by researchers from the Umeå University in Sweden challenges “conventional thinking” that obesity is a “major risk factor” for cardiovascular disease and death.

The scientists studied health data for 4,046 identical twin pairs, which were “specifically selected for their differences in BMI,” Food Navigator reported.

They found that risk of heart attack or death was not significantly higher for the heavier twins, “even in pairs with a BMI difference of 7.0 or more, and where the heavier twin had a BMI of 30.0 or more.” However, risk for diabetes was higher for the heavier twins.

Among the twins with the higher body mass index, there were 203 heart attacks (5 percent) and 550 deaths, and the twins with a lower BMI had a recorded 209 heart attacks (5.2 percent) and 633 deaths.

“[The study shows] that there’s a strong association between obesity and diabetes,” said Peter Nordström, a researcher at Umeå University. “This leads us to conclude that weight reduction interventions can be more effective against diabetes than when it comes to reducing the risk of heart attack and mortality.”

Here are 12 heart-healthy foods that we think you should eat.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.


Obesity and Heart Disease: What’s the Connection?

Here’s the inside story on how and why being overweight or obese can increase your risk of having heart problems.

It’s a known fact that obesity can take a toll on your heart health. And there’s a plethora of research to back it up. For instance, a recent study published in April 2018 in the journal JAMA Cardiology concluded that adults between ages 40 and 59 who are overweight or obese have a significantly increased risk (ranging from 21 to 85 percent higher) of developing cardiovascular disease as compared with their normal weight peers. Individuals who are overweight, defined as having a body mass index (BMI) between 25 and 29.9, or are obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), also have a much greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease at a younger age. The research showed that individuals who are obese had a shorter lifespan.

The link between heart disease and obesity is multifaceted. For one thing, obesity increases your risk of developing many other risk factors for heart disease. It also triggers inflammatory processes that can harm your cardiovascular system, and it can lead to structural or functional changes in the heart itself. Read on for the details.