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11 Ways to Decorate Easter Eggs Without Dye (Slideshow)

11 Ways to Decorate Easter Eggs Without Dye (Slideshow)

Make Easter just as colorful and even more creative without dye kits

Puffy Paint

Add a little dimension to your Easter eggs with puffy paint. The raised paint is an eggcellent (had to) way to add depth and designs to your eggs in many colors. Puffy paint allows the decorator flexibility and precision in design — two things that dyeing lacks.

Sharpies

Using sharpies to embellish your Easter eggs is neat and easy. You can go all-out and use the colorful or even metallic varieties. For cool sophistication, use the original black Sharpie to draw designs like polka dots, chevron patterns, or even initials for a fun Easter table place setting idea.

Decoupage

Another dye-less way to pretty up eggshells is decoupage. All it takes is selecting the images you would like to use, from magazine pictures to family photos, arranging them on the egg, sticking the pictures on with Modge Podge, and then coating the entire surface with more Modge Podge to finish.

Glitter Eggs

Glitter is what dreams are made of, so why not put some sparkle on your Easter eggs with glitter and glitter pens. Minimize mess and heighten definition with glitter pens, or use an old paintbrush to apply glue for glitter.

Crayons

No time to waste with dyes and paints? Crayons are an extremely easy tool to decorate eggs and you probably already have plenty at home. Plus they come in an endless array of colors to satisfy any egg artist’s needs.

Stencils

Stencils always come in handy for DIY decorating. You can even make your own, so shapes are customizable for your Easter eggs and theme. You can either trace the shape or paint/color over the stencil, leaving the design on the egg.

Chalkboard Paint

For super customizable decorations, try painting your hard-boiled eggs withchalkboard paint. Once the paint is on and dry, let the decorating begin with colored chalk for those squiggles and dots. Made a mistake or want a do-over? Just erase the chalk and start again.

Temporary Tattoos

Decorating Easter eggs cannot be any easier than using temporary tattoos. Apply whichever tattoo you like as you would to your own skin ― once in place, dab with a damp paper towel, making sure the whole design sticks, peel back the paper backing and Voila!

Yarn Wrapped

Wrapping your eggs with colored yarn or embroidery floss can make for striped masterpieces. Dabs of glue, yarn or embroidery floss and a little patience can create banded eggs fit for any Easter basket. That’s a wrap.

Silk Dyeing

Kick “dyeing” your Easter eggs up a notch, and try the silk dyeing method. Transfer those beautiful colors and designs from your silk scraps (like old ties) onto your eggs for more elegant Easter decorations. Searching for pretty silk pieces at goodwill stores or around the house could be a warm up for those epic egg hunts on Easter Sunday.

Embroidered Eggs

Make eggs that are a cut above and try embroidering them for a different look. Stitch patterns to match Easter dinner themes or just show off your embroidering skills. This allows for imagination and creativity, as well as a keepsake to remember the holiday by.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.


By Erin Huffstetler | 03/12/2018 | 12 Comments

This post may contain affiliate links. View our disclosure.

Skip the Easter egg decorating kit this year. Here’s how make your own egg dye in minutes, using things you probably already have in your pantry.

How to Dye Easter Eggs Without a Kit

Ingredients:

Hard-boiled eggs
Food coloring
White vinegar

If You Don’t Have Vinegar: Use lemon juice in place of the vinegar, or just leave the vinegar out. Eggs dyed without vinegar will turn out pastel-colored. You need a mild acid, like vinegar or lemon juice to achieve really vibrant colors.

What You Do:

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.

Measure 1/2 cup of the boiling water into a canning jar or another heat-resistant container. Then, add one teaspoon of vinegar and 10-20 drops of food coloring to achieve your desired color. Repeat the process to create additional colors. We used neon food coloring to make most of the colors that you see here. If you’re working with small kids, allow the dye to cool before you move on to dying eggs.

Place eggs in your dye, and allow them to soak for around five minutes. You’ll probably need to flip your eggs partway through, so that both sides are evenly colored.

To give you an idea of what sorts of colors you can achieve, we dipped a brown egg and a white egg in each color. Those are brown eggs on the right side of the carton and white eggs on the left side. Aren’t they gorgeous?

If you want to get fancy, you can do some color-blocking by placing stickers on the eggs before you drop them into the dye. We had some spring-themed foam stickers on hand, so that’s what we used. Regular stickers would work just as well.

Here’s what the eggs looked like when we removed them from the dye baths.

And here’s an example of what they looked like after we peeled off the stickers.

How to Store Your Dyed Easter Eggs

Place your finished eggs back in their carton, and allow them to dry completely, before you move them to the refrigerator.

Tip: When you take your eggs out of the fridge, allow them to dry before you handle them. This will keep the colors from smearing or running.