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UK Cafe Project Aims to Help End the Stigma Against Mental Health

UK Cafe Project Aims to Help End the Stigma Against Mental Health

The project provides a space (and food) for people to come together and show ‘it’s OK to not be OK’

The sessions are designed for those who are stressed and “frazzled” over life situations and experiences.

Approximately one in five adults in the United States suffers from a mental illness every year, according to the National Alliance on Mental Health. That’s 43.8 million people who potentially face a stigma against mental health that might prevent them from talking freely about their experience. In the United Kingdom, one grocery store aims to change that and hopes to provide a space for people to get together and talk about mental health.

British grocer Marks & Spencer has teamed up with comedian and mental health advocate Ruby Wax to launch “Frazzled Cafes,” which will host sessions on a regular basis at pre-existing grocery spaces, according to the organization’s website.

The talk sessions will take place at M&S Cafes during after hours, with each one being led by a trained volunteer, according to the press release.

“With all this pressure, so many of us have nowhere to go to meet and talk about it,” Wax said in a statement. “Frazzled Cafe is about people coming together to share their stories, calmly sitting together, stating their case and feeling validated as a result. Feeling heard, to me, has always been half the cure.”

Eleven M&S stores will host Frazzled Cafe meetings during the next few months, including three locations in London along with Brighton, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Cambridge, Nottingham, Leeds, Newcastle, Canterbury, and Norwich. The grocer says that more locations will be added throughout the year.

The organization says that it has been running pilots and focus groups since last May in two groups in London and Brighton, which have served as a model for the regional launch.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


'I feel better for singing': the choir tackling mental health stigma

“I think there’s something physical about singing in a choir that does you good,” says Kaye Brown*. “For me it’s coming together, and the wellbeing I feel as a result of it. There’s a general improvement in my mental health. I feel better for singing.”

Brown, who is in her 60s and has a history of depression, anxiety and obsessive compulsive disorder, has been a member of the HarmonyChoir in Edinburgh since it began over a year ago. The choir was originally started by Liesbeth Tip, a clinical psychologist who is doing a PhD at the University of Edinburgh, as a two-month research project to explore the impact of singing on wellbeing and views of mental health. Due to popular demand, it is still going.

Every Monday evening, the choir meets to practise a repertoire of songs – including I Will Survive – led by musical director Ben Jones. It sang at the Edinburgh festival fringe and is due to perform various concerts over the Christmas period. Among its members are people with and without lived experience of mental health problems, as well as healthcare professionals.

Tip, who has sung in choirs before, says: “When I was a researcher, I worked for clinical trials and went to wards and mental health hospitals to speak with people and find out how they were doing. Over time, I heard positive stories about singing groups. People found them beneficial.”

The possible health and wellbeing benefits of singing weren’t all that interested Tip, however: “There’s stigma around mental health. People [with mental health problems] are still afraid to be judged. People still don’t understand.” she says. “I thought it would be good if people with and without mental health problems got together and talked to each other.”

Brown is no stranger to stigma. “Sometimes you’re not taken seriously because once you’ve got a label, people don’t believe what you’re saying,” she says. “It’s awful not to be believed, it’s very destabilising. I think the worst has been over the last couple of years [because I’ve faced problems at work]. In retrospect, I regret telling work that I have mental health problems.”

Lucy Stirland, 30, who works as a psychiatrist, has also seen stigma towards mental health within the NHS. She says: “Psychiatry isn’t seen as a real specialty among doctors. When I told the people I was working with that I had decided to do psychiatry, I remember a physician telling me it was a waste of a good doctor. That’s stigma against psychiatry, but also it’s demeaning to people who need psychiatric help.”

For the duration of Tip’s research project, choir members were asked a series of questions before and after each weekly rehearsal related to wellbeing and enjoyment, but also views around mental health in general. Tip’s research showed that attitudes of all the singers regarding what people with mental health problems could achieve, as well as thoughts around whether they are to blame for their problems and behaviour or not, improved significantly.


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