Traditional recipes

Two Rockers Create Tequila-Mezcal Blend

Two Rockers Create Tequila-Mezcal Blend

It may not be as dramatic as the first time someone combined peanut butter and jelly or rum and Coke, but the blending of tequila and mezcal is pretty heady stuff — if for no other reason than that it hasn’t been done before, at least commercially.

Both south-of-the-border spirits are made from the agave plant, though tequila must, by law, be made from one particular species, Weber blue agave (Agave tequilana), while mezcal can be produced from any agave plant. Additionally, tequila is primarily produced in the state of Jalisco (where the town of Tequila is located) — though some is also made in three neighboring states and in Tamaulipas to the east — while mezcal is generally associated with the state of Oaxaca, farther south.

The idea of bringing the two agave spirits together was born when two tequila drinkers of some renown, Hall of Fame rocker Sammy Hagar and his co-star on The Voice, singer and actor Adam Levine of Maroon 5, were hanging out together in Cabo San Lucas, at the southern tip of Baja California. (Hagar owns Cabo’s Cabo Wabo Cantina, along with a line of tequilas under the Cabo Wabo name.) What started as a crazy idea became a quest. Before all the financial planning sessions and the branding meetings took place, you can almost hear Hagar humming to himself: “Straight from my heart, oh tell me why can't this be love?

Hagar and Levine’s concept was brought to reality by third-generation master distiller Juan Eduardo Nuñez, who performed the marriage of mezcal and tequila at the El Viejito distillery in Jalisco. “When Adam and I started tasting the different blends, I knew we had something special that people would love,” Hagar has said. Thus, the two became the co-creators of Santo Mezquila, launched a few weeks ago.

Made from a combination of blue agave and espadin agave, Santo weighs in at 80 proof. The aromas and flavors are intriguing. On the nose, there is the smokiness of mezcal (but without the sweetish stewed vegetable character) and the salty smell of the sea. On the palate, there is a deftness of woven strands of smoke, dried herbs, and tropical fruits that keep repeating through the finish and aftertaste.

The square bottle, framed in basalt black with a cross-shaped label, retails for about $55.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Tequila is Mexico’s national drink and one of the icons synonymous with the country. The ‘Tequila’ marque is now protected world-wide and production of the drink is tightly regulated: only a handful of Mexican states have production rights, and the best Tequilas emanate from Blue Agave grown in the rich volcanic soils situated in the state of Jalisco. Tequila is made by harvesting the hearts (known in Spanish as piñas ) of the Blue Agave (ah-gah-veh) plant, slowly baking them in large ovens, and then pressing the pulp into a sweet liquid that is passed through a prescribed distillation process. Afterwards, the Tequila is transferred into specially-prepared wood barrels and left to age. The precise process, barrel type and aging time determines the Tequila’s classification, and strict labeling regulations enable buyers to know what type they are paying for. The highest quality Tequilas are made from 100% agave, whereas less expensive varieties use a mixture of agave and sugar cane. Tequila can be enjoyed straight or mixed into a variety of cocktails, the most of popular of which is the Margarita. You can find tequila cocktail recipes on the Mexican Bar here on Mexperience.

Mezcal is distilled using a similar production process to tequila but the tastes and nuances of the final blend are distinct. Mezcal, once a semi-obscure cousin to tequila, has recently gained widespread popularity and so the Mexican government acted to regulate its production, helping to improve the quality of mass-produced varieties and thus giving confidence to the wider market. As with Tequila, Mezcal is produced by baking the hearts ( piñas ) of the agave but unlike Tequila, which is made exclusively from Blue Agave, Mezcal may be produced from nearly 30 different varieties of agave. Most Mezcal is produced using the espadín agave, although distillers also blend different varieties of the plant with the intention of creating unique flavors. The drink undergoes an aging process and, like Tequila, an aged Mezcal feels more robust and often smoother on the palate than the younger alternatives. The best Mezcal —like the best Tequila— is made from 100% agave and like Tequila, less expensive varieties use cane sugars and contain other flavorings. Mezcal has a distinctively smoky flavor which for many is an acquired taste. Purists assert that Mezcal doesn’t lend itself to being mixed in cocktails, although there are plenty of Mezcal cocktail recipes to try out. Traditionally, Mezcal is taken straight with a pinch of sal de gusano : a condiment made by grinding together dried larvae, chiles , and salt. Mezcal may also contain a ‘worm’ (larvae) at the base of the bottle—this is a ploy concerned only with the product’s marketing and does not alter the taste. Tequila never has a ‘worm’ in the bottle.


Watch the video: Tequila u0026 Mezcal Cocktails (January 2022).